Lovely, Dark, and Deep

May 6, 2022

Spring is progressing more slowly and tentatively this year. Trees are starting to bud but no leaves yet. I saw a few Broad-Winged Hawks the other day.

I’ve been out hiking most days this week. You have to take advantage of the sunny days when they occur, because you can always count on rainy days to stay at home and write.

Still no luck on the housing situation. No luck on the job hunt. No luck on the search for an agent. I’m becoming very tense. Probably it’s the lunar eclipse. I tend to feel eclipse energy early. I don’t know whether it’s sensitivity from my four planets in Pisces or the Aries inclination to be first.

I have completed my series on Huwawa, and it will be on Return to Mago next week. I will post a link.

Happy Beltane

April 29, 2022

Winter and spring are still tussling where I live. A heavy snow last week caused an electricity outage, and I did not have internet access for a week. More snow is predicted today.

This Beltane coincides not only with a new moon, but a solar eclipse.

I have been hard at work finishing my four-part essay on the Mesopotamian giant Huwawa. It will be up in a few weeks.

I’ve been feeling antsy this week, like it’s time for a road trip. Believe it or not, I’m feeling pulled toward a city.

Peeper Patrol

April 15, 2022

I had been wondering where the Spring Peepers were – those tiny frogs with a sometimes deafening chorus that emerge about this time of year. Then one day this week they were all out in force. The clip below doesn’t sound nearly loud or full enough.

Audio from Paul Smith’s College VIC

Prowling the marshes, I ran across this beauty. I’m guessing these are frog eggs, possibly Spring Peepers.

Puddles in fields and at the edge of marshes are important to amphibian reproduction. Since these puddles will dry up as the season progresses, they are not frequented by fish who would eat the eggs. The young hatchlings have a chance to develop in the water and are ready to survive on land as the puddles disappear.

Salamanders are out again. Here are Northern Two-Lined Salamanders mating.

Inexorable Spring, Internet Outage Edition

April 8, 2022

There was still ice this week on Clements Pond, which surprised me. Otherwise, the trail was clear – one of the few that aren’t muddy. About a mile-and-a-half through hardwood forest to the pond. I saw a Northern Harrier (Marsh Hawk). I think this might be one of the first arrivals of the migrating spring hawks. They like open fields and wetlands. The Rough Legged Hawks are long gone, migrating back north. Yesterday on my drive to Lake Champlain I saw a pair of Osprey, sitting on an electric pole. No doubt planning a nest.

We’ve had a bout of electricity outages the past few weeks. Most of them have been short-lived, but they’ve caused longer interruptions in internet service. It’s good for me to be reminded how much I depend on the internet, since I’m still looking for a place to live and much of the area does not have internet service.

I notice that the pictures I’ve taken the past month look bleak. By next month there will be more color in the landscape. When I first moved to the North Country I hated the spring, because the weather is so topsy turvy and it’s muddy on the trails. Now I enjoy spring. Part of it is breaking free of the long hard cold winters, but it’s also the movement that I enjoy – something that doesn’t show up well in a photograph. The water begins moving, there are little animals scurrying around. Birds are returning. There’s a sense of things about to happen.

At Roaring Brook

April 1, 2022

Cold and snow made a reappearance this week. I realized that I have, subconsciously, been taking credit for the spring. I was feeling like “we” were making progress on all this snow melting. All I did for the spring was live to see it, though I admit that’s not an insignificant achievement, especially these past few years.

I’ve been enjoying getting out and about just the same.

Hanging In and Hanging On

March 18, 2022

Still looking for another home, in between late winter hiking. The Ravens, Black-Capped Chickadees, and Red Squirrels are actively scolding me on the trail as they begin courting and nesting. This is taken from John’s Brook today. Sugaring is in full swing, as the winter melt begins.

So It Goes

February 4, 2022

I’ve been working on another longish blogpost, planning to enjoy the snowstorm by curling up with a cup of hot chocolate and wrapping up my words of wisdom, but something de-stabilizing in my life has interrupted my focus. It’s time to recognize that it’s not happening this week.

Enjoy this winter pic of the Ausable River.

After Samhain

November 5, 2021

We’re waiting for the first snow now. Mornings are frosty, and I’m putting the car in the garage overnight again. I just finished a long article about the giant Huwawa. I’ll have a link next week.

A Watery Fall

October 15, 2021

I’ve been seeing a lot of mushrooms in the woods the past month. Usually it’s late spring/early summer when mushrooms are abundant. To me, mushrooms have a fairy association, and of course an association with water.

This picture may look like it’s upside down, but it’s Chalis Pond on a clear day.

This Red-spotted Newt was very patient and co-operative.

The Mountain Ash is related to the European Rowan.

Mid October and still no snow on Giant Mountain.

Happy trails!