Divining with Animal Guides: Answers from the world at hand

Understand the meaning of messages in your daily encounters.

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About the book

Invoking Animal Magic: A guide for the pagan priestess

Explore the wonders of animal wisdom and lore.

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About the book

This experiential knowledge continues to investigate itself as inseparable from all of life. ~ Danica Anderson, PhD, Social Scientist-Forensic Psychotherapist, author of Blood and Honey the Secret Herstory of Women

Reviews

PaganPages

Excerpt from review of Divining with Animal Guides:

“I was delighted to discover that Divining with Animal Guides is not a cookbook dictionary, concretizing the ‘meanings’ of animal encounters. Author Hearth Moon Rising has created a manual for learning to observe and discern and ultimately, to shift our strictly human viewpoint. Only when we look at the context in which the animals offer us their messages are we able to fully understand their invitations and gifts.

(continued)

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Interviews

Radio Program with Susun Weed

Susun Weed interviews Hearth February 27, 2018 about animal divination.

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Divining with Animal Guides…teaches ways of using both intuition and knowledge to get messages from animals and offers excellent research and practical guidance. ~ Lucya Szachnowski, A Bad Witch’s Blog.

Latest Blog Post

The Quiet Time of Year

November 20, 2020

A late winter has finally arrived. About 25 degrees Fahrenheit and that feels cold, quite unsettling in a place where winters typically move far below zero at night for days, even weeks, at a time. First electricity outage of the winter occurred a few days ago, though for less than an hour. When I first moved to the Adirondacks, electricity outages were a constant problem, but they’ve become less frequent. Still, there’s trepidation at the thought of potentially losing heat on a cold cold night.

I went on my first hike in winter boots this week, with only a dusting of snow on the ground. Didn’t bother with the camera, since the battery becomes exhausted quickly. My first ten minutes in the cold, I decided I would only go for short winter walks this season, maybe half an hour or so. Then I stayed out a full hour and didn’t want to come back even then. I’d forgotten how special a winter hike can be, and what a good mood it leaves you with.

Rough-legged Hawks are back in Vermont! I saw more than I could count on my drive to Middlebury. They spend time in Northeast farming country during the winter, hunting small rodents in open fields. I don’t see them in the Adirondacks, probably because there isn’t as much open country, there’s more snow, and it’s a bit colder. In the spring Rough-legged Hawks will head north, as they breed in the Arctic region. They are circumpolar birds, found in North America and Eurasia.

Photo: US Fish & Wildlife Service
Photo: US Fish & Wildlife Service
Photo: Walter Siegmund

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